Holi festival in India

Holi festival in India
The same tradition has transpired through the ages, turning it into a community festival of the masses. As time kept flowing, the culture spread roots to other regions of the country. The Holi play of Krishna is documented in hundreds of ancient paintings, murals, sculptures and scriptures found across the subcontinent
Holi is a harvest celebration marking the climax of spring. Bonfires are lit, marking both the end of winter and the death of evil, and proceeds from the seasonal harvest- grains, coconuts etc- offered to the flames. Usually this is a community celebration and people gather near the fire to fill the air with folk strains and dances. Crossroads. Sheaves of green gram and wheat are roasted in the bonfire and eaten.
The actual festival of Holi takes place the day after this known as Dulhendi which involves plenty of colour throwing, prayer, fasting and feasting. This Year Dulhendi celebrates on 17 March 2014. People have fun throwing colored powder and colorful water at each other, dancing and gambling over cards. Water balloons are thrown at friends and neighbors in the spirit of fun. Sometimes, mud baths are prepared and people are 'dunked' into this a midst much laughter and teasing.
The visitors carry 'abeer' or 'gulal' to pay their respects to elders by sprinkling some on their feet. The younger crowd is drenched with buckets of colored water and pummeled with water balloons. 'Dholaks' or Indian drums are heard everywhere and the songs of Holi are carried by the voices of these merry-makers.
There is no 'puja' or worship associated with this festival of colors. The special food items that are prepared for Holi are gujjia, papri and kanji ke vade.


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